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AG Millworks
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LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WOOD SPECIES WE OFFER
ACCOYA

Accoya Wood is solid stock lumber that does not rot. It is modified timber in which a process called acetylation, a cutting-edge patented technology, enables it to defy the elements and stay strong for decades. Accoya is available for all-wood units and comes with a 5 year warranty and no overhang requirement.

 


Main Uses

The most common applications of Accoya Wood are windows and doors, cladding, wooden decking, and structural.

Relative Abundance
Accoya wood is produced with only abundantly available wood species from certified, sustainably managed forests and plantations.

Did You Know? 
During manufacturing, Accoya wood is produced using 50% renewable energy. 

General Description 
Accoya's stability reduces swelling and shrinkage, ensuring doors and windows open effortlessly year round. Its outstanding durability withstands the elements. Accoya is easier to coat and can be painted or stained. Improved stability means coatings last up to two times longer than coating on other woods.

Working Properties 
Accoya is easy to machine and process. No special tools are required.  

Physical Properties 
Accoya is pale yellow in color and naturally beautiful wood. The modifying process does not compromise the wood's natural beauty. It offers improved insulation in comparison with commonly used hardwoods and softwood species.

Availability 
Readily available.

AFRICAN MAHOGANY

An excellent cabinet and veneer species because of its long trunk form, rapid growth, and attractive pinkish-red to deep reddish brown lustrous wood. African Mahogany is interlocked or straight grain, often with a ribbon figure, and a moderately coarse texture. Mahogany has reddish brown heartwood, often with a purple cast.

 


Where It Grows
The Mahogany (African) tree grows in West Africa, primarily Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria. The tree species can reach heights of 140 feet with trunk diameter up to 72" above large buttresses.

Main Uses

African Mahogany is used for Furniture, cabinets, interiors, boat building, veneer, desks, cabinets, entry doors, stairs, moldings and trim.

Relative Abundance
The wood is greater in abundance resulting in lower cost.

Did You Know? 
The bark is bitter and used to treat colds, while the seed oil can be rubbed into the scalp to kill insects like lice. 

General Description 
The wood varies from light to deep reddish-brown in color and has moderately coarse texture with interlocking grain. The wood is fairly brittle; you should watch for cross break when machining. 

Working Properties 
African Mahogany works fairly well with only moderate blunting of tools. The grain will fuzz if not cut with a reduced cutting angle of 15-20 degrees due to the interlocking grain. Easy to work, glue, and finish.  

Physical Properties 
The African Mahogany grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium to coarse texture. Good natural luster with a light-refracting optical phenomenon known as chatoyancy. 

Availability 
Readily available.

CHERRY WOOD

Like all fruit trees, cherry belongs to the rose family. American Colonists used the cherry tree for its fruit, medicinal properties, and home furnishings. They mixed cherry juice with rum to create Cherry Bounce, a bitter but highly favored cordial. The bark was used in the production of drugs to treat bronchitis, and cherry stalks were used to make tonics.

 


 

Where It Grows

Eastern U.S., principally Northern and Lake states. The average tree is 60 to 70 feet in height. 

Main Uses

Fine furniture and cabinet making, mouldings and millwork, kitchen cabinets, paneling, flooring, doors, boat interiors, musical instruments, turnings, and carvings.

Relative Abundance

3.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Early printmakers used cherry for their engraving blocks.

General Description

The heartwood of cherry varies from rich red to reddish brown and will darken with age and exposure to light. In contrast, the sapwood is creamy white. The wood has a fine uniform, straight grain, satiny, smooth texture, and may naturally contain brown pith flecks and small gum pockets.

Working Properties

Cherry is easy to machine, nails and glues well, and when sanded and stained, it produces an excellent smooth finish. It dries fairly quickly with moderately high shrinkage, but is dimensionally stable after kiln-drying.

Physical Properties

The wood is of medium density with good bending properties, it has low stiffness and medium strength and shock resistance.

Availability

Readily available.

 

CLEAR ALDER

Alders are commonly found near streams, rivers, and wetlands. In the Pacific Northwest of North America, the White Alder has an affinity for warm, dry climates, where it grows along watercourses, such as along the lower Columbia River east of the Cascades and the Snake River, including Hells Canyon. Alder leaves, and especially the roots, are important to the ecosystem because they enrich the soil with nitrogen and other nutrients. The Alder leaves are also used as food by various butterflies and moths.
  


Where It Grows

Alder is the leading hardwood of the Pacific Northwest, averaging a height of 90 feet and weighing 29 to 31 pounds per cubic foot.

Main uses

Alder is used for the creation of furniture, kitchen cabinets, doors, shutters, mouldings, panel stock, turnings, carvings and kitchen utensils. Adler is a great medium for smoking meats and fish and is used in cooking and barbecuing in the same way as hickory and mesquite, to add flavor. The wood is an excellent fuel source; however, Alder is considered too valuable to be used for firewood.

Relative Abundance

2.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Alder matures in 25 to 40 years and then starts to deteriorate by 60 to 80 years of age. Alders also aid trees growing near it because its root system puts nitrogen into the soil that help it’s neighboring conifers grow.

General Description

Alder, a relative of birch, is almost white when freshly cut but quickly changes on exposure to air, becoming light brown with a yellow or reddish tinge. The wood is fairly straight-grained with a uniform texture

Working Properties

Alder machines well and is excellent for turning. It nails, screws and glues well, and can be sanded, painted, or stained to a good finish. When stained, it blends with walnut, mahogany or cherry. It dries easily with little degrade and has good dimensional stability after drying.

Physical Properties

With its medium density, Alder is moderately light in weight and intermediate in most strength properties.

Availability

Readily available.

CLEAR CEDAR (No Knots)

Cedar wood comes from several different trees known as Cedars that grow in different parts of the world, and may have different uses. Cedar from Cedrus, was once an important timber in the Mediterranean area, used for building and shipbuilding, but serverely overexploited for thousands of years.

 


Where It Grows

Cedar trees grow in the Pacific Northwest of North America where weather is damp, and where fungus, microorganisms, and insect subject trees to destructive conditions. The cedar tree can grow to a height of 33-66 feet tall with a 1ft to 4 inch trunk in diameter. 

Main Uses

​Cedar is used in many building products including; siding, decking, fencing, shingles, gazebos, sheds, furniture, moulding, doors, windows, blinds, shutters, and garden planters.

Relative Abundance

With limited growing range and relatively small tree size, the Cedar is more expensive than most other conifers in the eastern United States. ​

Did You Know?

​Cedar trees have developed self-protective qualities that allow the tree to fend off insects, rot and temperature related stresses. That makes cedar wood very useful as home building material where humidity, temperature, and cracking are a common problem.

General Description

​Clear Cedar has a few flaws (such as knots or splits) and, because of their superior quality and appearance, tends to be more expensive. They also accept paints, stains and water repellents easily. The Clear Cedar tends to give a home a more refined, upscale look.

Working Properties

​The Cedar wood is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. The tree holds paint, stains, glues, and finishes well.

Physical Properties

​The Clear Cedar grain is straight, with a fine uniform texture.

Availablity

Readily Available ​

DOUGLAS FIR (Vertical Grain)

Douglas-fir trees, which are also called red firs, Oregon pines, and Douglas spruce, are neither true fir trees nor pines nor spruces! The scientific genus name Pseudotsuga means “false hemlock,” alluding to another kind of tree that Douglas-firs are similar to. Douglas-firs are evergreen trees, meaning that they keep their needle-like leaves year round.


 


 

Where It Grows

The Douglas Fir can grow up to 195–245 feet tall and diameters up to 14 feet 9 in–19 feet 8 in.

Main Uses

Douglas Fir is used in furniture, doors, frames, windows, plywood, veneer, general millwork and interior trim.

Relative Abundance

Douglas-fir's abundance in the mixed-conifer zone tends to decrease and that of ponderosa pine increase from north to south within this zone.

Did You Know?

Douglas-firs were used by American Indians for building, basketry, and medicinal purposes. Ailments that Douglas firs were used to cure is stomach aches, headaches, rheumatism, and the common cold.

General Description

There are two varieties of this species, coast Douglas-fir and Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir, which are differentiated by their habitats, growth rates, and physical characteristics. When Douglas-firs grow in dense forests, they self-prune their lower branches so that the conical crown starts many stories above the ground. Trees growing in open habitat, especially younger trees, have branches much closer to the ground.

Working Properties

Typically machines well, but have a moderate blunting effect on cutters. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

Physical Properties

The Douglas Fir grain is generally straight, or slightly wavy; with a medium to coarse texture, with moderate natural luster.

Availability

Readily available.

GENUINE MAHOGANY

Tropical Hardwoods  including mahogany, rosewood, teak and wenge - are not native to North America. They grow in the tropical forests of the world and must be imported for domestic use. While some tropical hardwoods can be used for interior applications, including flooring, the color, grain pattern, hardness and luster of many imported woods differ from those of American hardwoods.
 


Where It Grows

Eastern U.S., principally Northern and Lake states. The average tree is 60 to 70 feet in height. 

Main uses

Fine furniture and cabinet making, mouldings and millwork, kitchen cabinets, paneling, flooring, doors, boat interiors, musical instruments, turnings and carvings.

Relative Abundance

3.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Early printmakers used cherry for their engraving blocks.

General Description

The heartwood of cherry varies from rich red to reddish brown and will darken with age and on exposure to light. In contrast, the sapwood is creamy white. The wood has a fine uniform, straight grain, satiny, smooth texture, and may naturally contain brown pith flecks and small gum pockets.

Working Properties

Cherry is easy to machine, nails and glues well and when sanded and stained, it produces an excellent smooth finish. It dries fairly quickly with moderately high shrinkage, but is dimensionally stable after kiln-drying.

Physical Properties

The wood is of medium density with good bending properties, it has low stiffness and medium strength and shock resistance.

Availability

Readily available.

KNOTTY ALDER

Knotty Alder is chosen for its rustic, informal appearance. Knots vary in size and distribution and include tight, sound knots as well as rustic, open and split knots. Alder is a smooth hardwood with color and graining similar to Cherry ranging from a light honey color to a reddish-brown hue. With time and exposure to sunlight, Knotty Alder will turn a shade lighter in color which is a natural characteristic of the species.


 


 

Where It Grows

The Knotty Alder grows principally in the Pacific Northwest, where it is the most abundant commercial hardwood. Average height is 90 feet and the tree matures in 25 to 40 years, but will begin to deteriorate by 60 to 80 years of age. Alder grows well on burned over lands and thrives in areas that have been ravaged by fire, earthquakes or logging.

Main Uses

The Knotty Alder is used for furniture, kitchen cabinets, doors, shutters, mouldings, panel stock, turnings, carvings and kitchen utensils.

Relative Abundance

2.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Alder is used in the smoking of meats and fish.

General Description

Alder, a relative of birch, is almost white when freshly cut but quickly changes on exposure to air, becoming light brown with a yellow or reddish tinge. Heartwood is formed only in trees of advanced age and there is no visible boundary between sap and heartwood. The wood is fairly straight-grained with a uniform texture.

Working Properties

Alder machines well and is excellent for turning. It nails, screws and glues well, and can be sanded, painted, or stained to a good finish. When stained, it blends with walnut, mahogany or cherry. It dries easily with little degrade and has good dimensional stability after drying.

Physical Properties

Alder is a relatively soft hardwood of medium density that has low bending strength, shock resistance and stiffness.

Availability

Readily available.

KNOTTY CEDAR

Knotty Cedar is a spicy- viscous scented wood, thick ridge bark, with broad, level branches. The shoots are dimorphic; the long shoots form the framework of the branches, and the short shoots carry most of the leaves. Leaves are evergreen and needle-like that varies from bright grass-green to dark green to strongly glaucous pale blue-green; depending on the thickness of the white wax layer which protects the leaves from the dryness. Their seeded cones are barrel-shape that begin green and mature to a grey-brown.  
 

 


Where It Grows

Cedar is native to the mountains of the western Himalayas and the Mediterranean region, occurring at altitudes of 1,500–3,200 m in the Himalayas and 1,000–2,200 m in the Mediterranean. They can grow up to an average of 100-130 feet tall.

Main uses

Knotty Cedar is used for the creation of furniture, kitchen cabinets, doors, outdoor decks, fences, and mouldings.

Relative Abundance

Among the most widespread trees in the Pacific Northwest

Did You Know?

Cedar wood and Cedar oil are known to be a natural repellent to moths; hence cedar is a popular lining for modern-day cedar chests and closets in which woolens are stored.

General Description

Knotty Cedar also referred to as Tight Knot Cedar is a lower cost alternative to Clear Cedar. This grade of Cedar has many knots and grain variations. Most of the knots are from live branches; very few if any will ever fall out.

Working Properties

Cedar is among the easiest and most rewarding woods to work with. It takes a fine finish in all hand and machine operations, takes fasteners without splitting and is easily sawn and nailed; sharp cutters are recommended.

Physical Properties

With its knots and grain variation, Cedar has twice the stability of most commonly available softwoods. However, being one on the world’s most durable woods, it lacks strength.

Availablity

Readily available.

 
NORTH AMERICAN RED OAK

The Latin name for oak, Quercus, means "a fine tree." The oaks have been key in America's industrial transformation: railroad ties, wheels, plows, looms, barrels and, of course, furniture and floors. The oak is the state tree of New Jersey.

 

 


 

Where It Grows

The North American Red Oak is widespread throughout Eastern U.S. The oaks are by far the most abundant species group growing in the Eastern hardwood forests. Red oaks grow more abundantly than the white oaks. The red oak group comprises many species, of which about eight are commercial. Average tree height is 60 to 80 feet.

Main Uses

North American Red Oak is used for furniture, flooring, architectural millwork and mouldings, doors, kitchen cabinets, paneling and caskets.

Relative Abundance

36.6 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

The bark from oak trees is rich in tannin.

General Description

The sapwood of red oak is white to light brown and the heartwood is a pinkish reddish brown. The wood is similar in general appearance to white oak, but with a slightly less pronounced figure due to the smaller rays. The wood is mostly straight-grained, with a coarse texture.

Working Properties

Red oak machines well, nailing and screwing are good although pre-boring is recommended, and it can be stained to a good finish. It can be stained with a wide range of finish tones. It dries slowly.

Physical Properties

The wood is hard and heavy, with medium bending strength and stiffness and high crushing strength. It is very good for steam bending. The Red Oak has great wear-resistance.

Availability

Abundant, most widely used species.

NORTH AMERICAN WHITE OAK

North American White Oak can become quite massive as its lower branches are apt to extend far out laterally, parallel to the ground. Trees growing in a forest will become much taller than ones in an open area which are short and massive. The tallest known White Oak is 144 ft tall. It is not unusual for a White Oak tree to be as wide as it is tall, but specimens growing at high altitudes may only become small shrubs. White Oak may live 200 to 300 years, with some even older specimens known.

 


 

Where It Grows

North American White Oak is one of the pre-eminent hardwoods of eastern and central North America. It is a long-lived oak, native to eastern and central North America and found from MinnesotaOntarioQuebec, and Nova Scotia south as far as northern Florida and eastern Texas. Specimens have been documented to be over 450 years old.

Main uses

White oak has tylosis that give the wood a closed cellular structure, making it water- and rot-resistant. Because of this characteristic, white oak is used by coopers to make wine and whiskey barrels as the wood resists leaking. It has also been used in construction, shipbuilding, agricultural implements, and in the interior finishing of houses.

Relative Abundance

North American White Oak is fairly tolerant of a variety of habitats, and may be found on ridges, in valleys, and in between, in dry and moist habitats, and in moderately acid and alkaline soils. It is mainly a lowland tree, but reaches altitudes of 5,249 ft in the Appalachien Mountains. It is often a component of the forest canopy in an oak-health forest.

Did You Know?

Barrels made of American white oak are commonly used for oak aging of wine, in which the wood is noted for imparting strong flavors. Also, by federal regulation, Bourbon Whiskey must be aged in charred new oak (generally understood to mean specifically American white oak) barrels. 

General Description

Although called a white oak, it is very unusual to find an individual specimen with white bark; the usual color is a light gray. In the forest it can reach a magnificent height and in the open it develops into a massive broad-topped tree with large branches striking out at wide angles.

Working Properties

The White Oak has been used in construction, shipbuilding, agricultural implements, and in the interior finishing of houses. It was a signature wood used in mission style oak furniture by Gustsv Stickley in the Craftsman style of the Arts and Crafts movement. White oak is used extensively in Japanese martial arts for some weapons, such as the bokken and jo. It is valued for its density, strength, resiliency and relatively low chance of splintering if broken by impact, relative to the substantially cheaper red oak.


Physical Properties

It has also been used in construction, shipbuilding, agricultural implements, and in the interior finishing of houses

Availability

Readily available.

PINE

Pine is coniferous tree that belongs to the family Pinaceae. There are around 115 species of pines that are divided in 3 subgenera based on the type of leaves, cones and seeds. Pines inhabit Northern hemisphere. They can survive in different habitats in the temperate and subtropical climates. Pines can be found on the altitudes of up to 13 000 feet. Most pines grow on the acidic, well-drained soil.


 


 

Where It Grows

Pines are sun-loving trees that do not grow well under shady conditions. Most of these trees live in the Northern Hemisphere, except for the Sumatran pine surviving south of the equator. The average Pine can grow up 50–150 feet tall.

Main uses

Pin is used for furniture, window frames, panelling, floors and roofing, and the resin of some species is an important source of turpentine.

Relative Abundance

There is a widespread abundance of Pines with in the Northern Hemisphere.

Did You Know?

Pine plantations can be harvested after 30 years, with some stands being allowed to grow up to 50 years; now that’s a good aging process!

General Description

Pines are long-lived, and typically reach ages of 100–1,000 years, some even more. The bark of most pines is thick and scaly, but some species have thin, flaky bark. The branches are produced in regular "pseudo whorls", actually a very tight spiral but appearing like a ring of branches arising from the same point.

Working Properties

Pine wood is soft, medium in weight and has medium density. The strength properties are good. Sawing and machining is easy, gluing can be difficult depending on the percentage of resin in the wood.

Physical Properties

Pine is a soft, white or pale yellow wood which is light weight, straight grained and lacks figure. It resists shrinking and swelling. Knotty pine is often used for decorative effect.

Availability

Readily available.

 
QUARTER SAWN WHITE OAK

White Oak is the state tree of Connecticut, Illinois, and Maryland. White Oak is strong, beautiful, rot-resistant, easy-to-work, and economical, representing an exceptional value to woodworkers. Quarter-sawn boards have greater stability of form and size with less cupping, shrinkage across the width, shake and splitting, and other good qualities. The White Oak grain produces a decorative effect which shows a prominent ray.


 


 

Where It Grows

Widespread throughout the Eastern U.S., White Oak comprises many species, of which about eight are commercial. The trees prefer rich well drained soil, and average height is 60 to 80 feet.

Main uses

Furniture, flooring, architectural millwork, mouldings, doors, kitchen cabinets, paneling, barrel staves (tight cooperage) and caskets.

Relative Abundance

15.1 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Native Americans and early settlers would boil and eat white oak acorns.

General Description

The sapwood is light-colored and the heartwood is light to dark brown. White oak is mostly straight-grained with a medium to coarse texture, with longer rays than Red Oak; therefore, White Oak has more figure.

Working Properties

White oak machines well, nails and screws well although pre-boring is advised. Since it reacts with iron, galvanized nails are recommended. Its adhesive properties are variable, but it stains to a good finish. White Oak can be stained with a wide range of finish tones; however, the wood dries slowly.

Physical Properties

A hard and heavy wood with medium bending and crushing strength, low in stiffness, but very good in steam bending. White Oak has great wear-resistance.

Availability

Readily available but not as abundant as Red Oak

SAPELE MAHOGANY

Sapele is a commonly exported and economically important African wood species. It’s   sold both in lumber and veneer form. It is occasionally used as a substitute for Genuine Mahogany, and is sometimes referred to as “Sapele Mahogany.” Technically, the two genera that are commonly associated with mahogany are Swietenia and Khaya, while Sapele is in the Entandrophragma genus, but all three are included in the broader Meliaceae family, so comparisons to true mahogany may not be too far-fetched.

 


Where It Grows

Sapele Mahogany grows right along the equator, from the Congo to Uganda, and also in Ghana and a few other spots in West Africa. Sapele can grow up to 100-150 feet tall and 3-5 feet in trunk diameter.

Main Uses

The Sapele Mahogany is typically used for veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

Relative Abundance

Sapele is listed as vulnerable due to a population reduction of over 20% in the past three generations, caused by a decline in its natural range, and exploitation. ​

Did You Know?

Machine dust from the Sapele species can be irritating, causing both skin and breathing problems, so a good dust collection system is a must.

General Description

Sapele is generally a little darker than other mahogany species, running more to brown than red. Flat-sawn boards are relatively uniform in color and grain, while quartersawn sapele is very distinctly striped. It can distort and move a little more than its cousins, too. The surface at times can be “hairy” because of the interlocked grain, and sanding can often produce better surfacing results than knives.

Working Properties

Sapele can be troublesome to work in some machining operations, resulting in tearout due to its interlocked grain. It will also react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Sapele has a slight blunting effect on cutters, but it turns, glues, and finishes well.

Physical Properties

Sapele Mahogany is a golden to dark reddish brown; however, the color tends to darken with age. Besides the common ribbon pattern seen on quartersawn boards, Sapele is also known for a wide variety of other figured grain patterns, such as: pommele, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback.

Availability

Readily available.

RIFT SAWN WHITE OAK

White Oak is the state tree of Connecticut, Illinois, and Maryland. White Oak is strong, beautiful, rot-resistant, easy-to-work, and economical, representing an exceptional value to woodworkers. Rift sawn is a technique of cutting boards from logs radially so the annual rings are nearly 90° to the faces. When rift-sawn, each piece is cut along a radius of the original log, so that the saw cuts at right angles to the tree's growth rings.


 


 

Where It Grows

Widespread throughout the Eastern U.S., White Oak comprises many species, of which about eight are commercial. The trees prefer rich well drained soil, and average height is 60 to 80 feet.

Main Uses

Furniture, flooring, architectural millwork, mouldings, doors, kitchen cabinets, paneling, barrel staves (tight cooperage) and caskets.

Relative Abundance

15.1 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Native Americans and early settlers would boil and eat white oak acorns.

General Description

The sapwood is light-colored and the heartwood is light to dark brown. White oak is mostly straight-grained with a medium to coarse texture, with longer rays than Red Oak; therefore, White Oak has more figure.

Working Properties

White oak machines well, nails and screws well although pre-boring is advised. Since it reacts with iron, galvanized nails are recommended. Its adhesive properties are variable, but it stains to a good finish. White Oak can be stained with a wide range of finish tones; however, the wood dries slowly.

Physical Properties

A hard and heavy wood with medium bending and crushing strength, low in stiffness, but very good in steam bending. White Oak has great wear-resistance.

Availability

Readily available but not as abundant as Red Oak

SIPO MAHOGANY

Sipo Mahogany is gaining noteriety fast as the best Genuine Mahogany substitute out of Africa. In the same genus as Sapele, Sipo has a lot of the same properties that make a Sapele so poluar. Where Sipo differs is a not so pronounced interlocking grain for easier, tear out free work.

 

 


Where It Grows

The Sipo Mahogany species grow throughout the Caribbean and Central and South America. The Sipo can grow up to 150-200 feet tall and 3-5 feet trunk diameter.

Main Uses

Sipo Mahogany is used in furniture, cabinetry, veneer, boatbuilding, flooring, and turned objects.

Relative Abundance

​The Sipo Mahogany is listed as vulnerable due to a population reduction of over 20% in the past three generations, caused by a decline in its natural range, and exploitation.

Did You Know?

​Often called simply utile, this species has been used in Europe for a long time as a mahogany substitute and is gaining popularity in the U.S.

General Description

Sipo is lighter than Sapele but only a small percentage heavier than Genuine Mahogany.  Sipo also is much softer than Sapele and marginally harder than Genuine so Sipo has a lot of the easy to work characteristics that makes Genuine so appealing to furniture makers and architectural millwork houses.  ​

Working Properties

​Sipo can be troublesome to work in some machining operations, resulting in tearout due to its interlocked grain. It will also react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Turns, glues, and finishes well.

Physical Properties

​Sipo Mahogany is a uniform medium reddish brown. Well-defined sapwood is a paler yellow. Generally lacks any dramatic figuring of grain that is common in the closely related Sapele. The grain is interlocked, with a medium uniform texture; contains a moderate natural luster.

Availability

​Not frequently available, prices for Sipo should be moderate for an imported hardwood.

 

 

 

WALNUT

The roots of the walnut tree release a toxic material which may kill other plants growing above them. From the time of ancient Greeks until well into modern European history, walnuts symbolized fertility and were strewn at weddings. Just the opposite, in Romania, brides who wished to delay childbearing placed into the bodice of their wedding dresses one walnut for each year they hoped to wait.
 

 


 

Where It Grows

Throughout Eastern U.S., but principal commercial region is the Central states. The average Walnut tree can grow up to 100-150 feet.

Main uses

Walnut is used in all types of fine cabinet and furniture work, especially 18th century reproductions.

Relative Abundance

1.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?

Walnut trees begin producing nuts when they are about 10 years old, but the best nut production begins when trees are 30 years old. Good nut crops occur in about two out of five years.

General Description

The sapwood of walnut is creamy white, while the heartwood is light brown to dark chocolate brown, occasionally with a purplish cast and darker streaks. The wood develops a rich patina that grows more lustrous with age. Walnut is usually supplied steamed, to darken sapwood. The wood is generally straight-grained, but sometimes with wavy or curly grain that produces an attractive and decorative figure. This species produces a greater variety of figure types than any other.

Working Properties

Walnut works easily with hand and machine tools, and nails, screws and glues well. It holds paint and stain very well for an exceptional finish and is readily polished. It dries slowly, and care is needed to avoid kiln degrade. Walnut has good dimensional stability.

Physical Properties

Walnut is a tough hardwood of medium density, with moderate bending and crushing strengths and low stiffness. It has a good steam-bending classification.

Availability

Reasonable availability with regional limitations

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